Archive | November, 2014

Traybake-tastic

15 Nov

I do love a traybake. You may have noticed that I have more recipes for chocolate brownies on this blog than perhaps is strictly necessary. But I haven’t really indulged my love of a traybake with other recipes. That is about to change. You can look forward to such joys as the Malteser Traybake, various variations on a flapjack and a frangipane bakewell style thing. But for today you have the utter delight that is Sue Lawrence’s Lemony Fridge Cake. Checking her book I see that she calls it Lemon Fudge Cake. Whatever you call it, its a great and super easy recipe; and the perfect go-to recipe if you have a spare packet of digestives and a can of condensed milk in the cupboard, and a lemon or two to use up.

For those who don’t know Sue Lawrence, do yourself a favour and seek her out, or at least her writing. Her books are very readable – both well researched and well-written. And I’ve tried many of her recipes over the years and not one has ever failed. That’s some good cookery writing. This recipe is taken from her Book of Baking (although for some reason I’ve re-written the instructions).

If you’re looking for instant results, this isn’t the recipe for you – but it needs no actual baking, and is simplicity itself.

Lemony Fudge Cake

  • 150g / 5 1/2 oz / 1 1/2 sticks unsalted butter
  • 200g / 7 oz condensed milk (half a regular can)
  • 400g / 14 oz digestive biscuits
  • 100g / 3 1/2 oz / 2/3 cup desiccated coconut
  • 300g / 10 1/2 oz / 2 1/3 cups icing sugar
  • juice of 1 large juicy lemon
  1. Line a 23cm x 33cm / 9 x 13in Swiss roll tin
  2. If you have a microwave, put the butter in a large bowl and melt it in the microwave. If you don’t do it in a large pan over a gentle heat
  3. While the butter is melting, smash the digestives till they are mostly breadcrumb-like. A few larger lumps are fine. I do this by putting the biscuits into a high-sided bowl and bashing it with the rounded end of a basic rolling pin.
  4. Pour the condensed milk in with the melted butter and mix them together.
  5. Add the crushed biscuits and coconut and mix well together
  6. Pour into the prepared tin and press down. Chill in a fridge for a couple of hours
  7. Mix the sifted icing sugar with the lemon juice and carefully spread this over the biscuit base. Use a palette knife to spread it so it covers the whole base. Chill again.
  8. Cut into bars. You should be able to get 24 bars in total.

If you want to see other recipes you’ll find them all listed here.

 

 

 

Find a recipe…

9 Nov

Scroll down below this post if you want to get straight to the blether and the recipes. This is an attempt at creating an index of my recipes. I have created some categories, which may only really make sense to me. They are:

  • Preserves
  • Homebaking
  • Drinkies and other strange things
  • Supper and sides

Basically if it doesn’t fit in any of the other categories, it will be in the Drinkies one. Anyway, have a browse, find something that sounds intriguing and take a look. I’m not promising that all the recipes are perfect, but I’ve only included ones that work for me. Oh, and because of a recent comment, I should add that where recipes are by others, I have credited them, usually with a link so you can see more of what they cook. Where I wasn’t following someone else’s recipe there is no credit. If you think I’ve forgotten to credit you (or anyone else) in any recipe, my huge apologies, and do get in touch and I’ll sort it out.

Preserves

Apple chutney

Cinnamon apple jelly

Hot tomato chutney

Lemon curd

Orange and ginger marmalade

Plumbrillo

Rhubarb chutney

Rhubarb marmalade

Homebaking

Apple spice muffin

Apricot upside down cake

Bacon maple brownies

Banana chocolate nut cake

Beetroot cheesy muffins

Boozy BozzyFest Cakes aka mini pear cakes with white choc and gin frosting 

Bread – your basic white loaf, no-kneading required

Brown soda bread

Buttery butteries

Caraway biscuits

Cardamom chocolate brownies

Cheese scones

Cheesy sesame biscuits

Chilli chocolate tart

Chocolate spiced gingerbread

Christmas muffins (cranberry and clementine)

Energy bars

Filled meringue coffee cake

5 seed loaf

Florentine cookies

Gin and tonic muffins

Ginger chocolate hearts

Langues de chat

Lemon kisses

Lemony almondy cake

Lemony fudge cake

Light Christmas cake

Macarons / Macaroons

Melting moments

Millionaire’s shortbread

Nutty ginger bisuits

Orange, almond and chocolate cake

Parmesan and courgette herby muffins

Shiny cake

Spiced parsnip cake

Spicy cheese scones

Springtime apple cake

Sweet scones

Sweet and salty nutty bars

Sugar biscuits

Tattie scones

Tollhouse cookies

Triple chocolate ginger brownies

Tropical muffins

White cob loaf

White soda bread

Drinkies and other strange things..

Blackcurrant cordial

Blackcurrant hooch

Cranberry vanilla vodka

Cranberry sauce

Desert island bites (aka coconut truffles)

Elderflower vinegar

Granola

Hilda Gerber’s rich chocolate sauce

Lemonade

Mango salsa

Mayonnaise

Mint sugar

Plum brandy

Roasted spicy nuts

Roasted tomato sauce

Salty nut brittle

Strawberry sugar

Sweet chilli dipping sauce

Tartare sauce

White chocolate and cardamom tablet

Supper and sides

Autumn sausage supper

Beef stew

Beetroot and goats cheese jalousie

Beetroot and orange salad

Blackcurrant ripple icecream

Boiled egg

And another boiled egg

Borscht

Broccoli and stilton soup

Brown stew

Brussels sprouts with chestnuts

Carrot soup

Cheese and caramelised onion tart

Chicken chasseur

Chicken gumbo

Chicken liver pate

Chilli sweetcorn fritters with prawns

Chocolate panna cotta

Creamy brussels sprouts

Croutons

Fish gratin

Gingered beef stew

Janssens Temptation

Lentil soup

Marmalade-y sausages

Mushroom stuffed chicken breasts

Panzanella

Patatas a la Extremena

Poached eggs

Pork with apple and sage

Pork with orange and thyme

Scotch eggs

Slow roasted peppers in a jar

Spicy turmeric chicken

Spinach soup

Spring quiche

Throw it in the oven chicken dinner

Vegetable broth

Winter salad

Memories, remembering, remembrance

9 Nov

It is nearly 11am, on Remembrance Sunday, a time for reflection.

In my childhood I took part in the Remembrance parade at Gatehouse, the small town where I was brought up. Most of the town took part in some way – I consider standing watching this parade as participating. Some years we had bright shiny sun and a blue sky, other years were less kind, and there were years of grey clouds, of smirry rain and one or two of proper big rain. But still the town turned out to remember. Mum nearly always wore her Astrakhan coat. I never really knew what an Astrakhan coat was, except that it was an inherited, enormously heavy black fur, with a curly coat, like a big black lamb. We all wrapped up warm. We were all freezing cold by lunchtime.

We would march up the town, past the clock tower to the War Memorial, a simple granite cross. The traffic through the town was stopped, and this, perhaps more than anything was what first told me that this was important. Mum told me about her Uncle Bobby who had died in the war, but when I was young I don’t think I really understood. I felt I should think of real people during that 2 minute silence, but I didn’t feel emotionally connected to anyone who had died in a war. I didn’t actually know any of them. I am lucky in that I still have no direct connection to anyone who has died in any war. But I do feel a real connection with this act of remembrance. I feel it is an honour and a duty for me to recognise it in some way each year.

When I first lived in London in the early 1980s I attended the ceremony at the Cenotaph each year, probably for about 8 – 10 years. It felt like the right thing to do, to show my respect, my thanks for those who had given their lives so that we could live in freedom. I thank them. And thank them again. I suspect that attending the Cenotaph is a different experience these days; there will be more security, and just more people there. The crowds were much smaller in the 80s and early 90s, despite the recent war in the Falklands. Most years, I had a direct line of sight to the Queen, who was only 30 or 40 feet away from me.

Since then I have mostly listened to it on Radio 4, or watched the BBC coverage of the ceremony. I don’t remember in what year it was that a silent tear first fell down my cheek, but now it never fails. So, here I sit considering those familiar words:

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them.

In my mind I feel the weight of the flag, as I lowered it, that one year. The determination not to let it wobble as it lowered, or as I raised it again. It may only have been the Girl Guide flag, but it mattered. It still does.

Memories are important.

Remembering matters.

Remembrance shows we care.

Apple chutney

5 Nov

Several years ago a friend off-loaded bags of apples on me. I put them in everything, but the favourite by far was the Apple Chutney from Judith Wills’ brilliant New Home Larder. It’s now my go-to chutney recipe and I think I’ve made it every year since. It’s a long long time since I had Branston Pickle, but I think this chutney might be similar to it, with a deep, dark colour and prefect balance of sharp and sweet.

Apple chutney

Apple chutney

Apple Chutney

  • 1.5kg apples
  • 750g onions
  • 1l malt vinegar
  • 500g sultanas
  • 1kg soft brown sugar
  • 1 dsp salt
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp ground ginger
  •  1/4 tsp ground cloves
  • 1 tsp dry English mustard
  1. Pour the vinegar into a large heavy based pan
  2. Peel and core the apples, cut them into chunks and pop them into the pan with the vinegar.
  3. Peel and chop the onions and add them into the pan too.
  4. Bring the apple, onion, vinegar mix to the boil and simmer for an hour.
  5. Add the remaining ingredients and stir thoroughly to dissolve the sugar – it will go runny and glossy.
  6. Bring back to the boil and simmer again for around 30 mins, stirring from time to time to prevent it burning and sticking tot he bottom of the pan.
  7. Pour into sterilised jars and cover with wax discs, then teh lids when cool.
  8. Store in a cool, dark place. Eat with cheese. Or cold meat.

You can adapt this recipe by adding some fresh or crystallised ginger, using different spices, or adding some chilli, but I think it’s pretty near perfect and doesn’t need any messing about.

If you want to see other recipes you’ll find them all listed here.

 

 

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